Brett Kavanaugh: Good News for Polluters, Bad News for Public Health

Policy Analysis

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

One reason to think twice before confirming Brett Kavanaugh to the critical open swing seat on the Supreme Court is his long record of adopting extreme views to defend polluters.

A close review of Kavanaugh’s record as a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia reveals that he repeatedly ruled to limit the Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to reduce pollution in air and water. The nonprofit law firm Earthjustice found that of 18 EPA-related cases decided on substantive, rather than procedural, grounds, Kavanaugh ruled in favor of more pollution in 16 cases.

To support these rulings, Kavanaugh either argued that the EPA should ignore the public health benefits of reducing pollution, that the EPA underestimated or ignored the cost of regulation to polluters, that judges should read statues in ways that limit the EPA’s ability to protect public health, or some combination of all three arguments.

In particular, Kavanaugh concluded in this case that the EPA lacks the authority under the federal Clean Air Act to regulate the greenhouse gases contributing to climate change. While Kavanaugh apparently believes that climate change is real and deserves our attention, he clearly does not believe that the EPA has the legal authority to do anything about it.

That’s despite the fact that the federal Clean Air Act gave EPA the authority to regulate any air pollutant, not just those listed by name in the law. Indeed, in this case, the Supreme Court ruled that greenhouse gases fit with the act’s “capacious” definition of an air pollutant.

That’s not all.

When the Trump administration sought to delay rules designed to reduce emissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, Kavanaugh sided with polluters. When the EPA sought to replace fluorinated chemicals known as HFCs to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, Kavanaugh complained that the proposed rule pulled the rug out from under polluters – even though replacement chemicals are readily available. Kavanaugh also supported giving large plants and factories more time to comply with greenhouse gas rules.

Even when Kavanaugh, citing precedent, concurred in a decision to uphold a greenhouse gas regulation, he doubled down on his view that the EPA lacks the authority to regulate greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide.

What’s more, Kavanaugh has also challenged the EPA’s authority to regulate air pollution that starts in upwind states like Ohio but pollutes downwind states like Maine. The Clean Air Act not only requires states to meet air quality goals but also empowers the EPA to ensure that upwind states bear their share of the pollution they cause in downwind states – the so-called “good neighbor” provision.

In this case, Kavanaugh argued that the EPA could not apportion sulfur dioxide and nitrous oxide pollution reductions among upwind states – even though EPA’s proposed rule would have prevented up to 34,000 premature deaths. The fact that the Supreme Court, including some of the Court’s conservative justices, found this view too extreme suggests just how willing Kavanaugh is to legislate from the bench to protect polluters.  

Of equally great concern should be Kavanaugh’s record of using flawed cost-benefit analysis to tip the scales in favor of polluters and against public health. Kavanaugh’s views on costs and benefits could not only block efforts to reduce air and water pollution but could also imperil efforts to regulate toxic substances like asbestos.

In one case, Kavanaugh sought to underestimate the public health benefits of reducing mercury pollution by discounting other benefits, like reducing particulate matter.

In some cases, Kavanaugh has adopted the view that the EPA must always weigh the costs to polluters against the benefits to public health – regardless of Congressional direction not to do so. When the EPA was proposing to regulate mercury emissions, Kavanaugh argued that the EPA was obligated to consider the costs of regulatory compliance to polluters. Likewise, when the EPA proposed to apportion cross-state pollution, Kavanaugh sided with industry by advocating for the regulation that is least costly to industry, not most protective of public health. In another case, Kavanaugh argued that the EPA had failed to consider the costs to a coal company dumping mine waste into streams, even though the agency had no obligation to consider cost.

Kavanaugh has also argued against giving deference to the EPA’s interpretation of the law, especially in cases related to air pollution. It’s very likely that Kavanaugh will be fifth vote to strike down the EPA’s view that certain kinds of small streams are protected by the federal Clean Water Act.

Before a polluter discharges pollution into a body of water subject to the Clean Water Act, the polluter must obtain a permit to ensure that the waterway does not become so polluted that it can no longer serve as a source of drinking water or support recreational uses like fishing. But if some small streams are excluded from the protections of the Clean Water Act, polluters discharging into those streams may avoid meeting water quality standards.

The last time the Supreme Court considered which bodies of water are covered by the Clean Water Act, the justices now on the court were evenly split. Justice Anthony Kennedy cast the deciding vote and wrote an opinion that concluded bodies of water were subject to the Clean Water Act when they had a “significant nexus” to bigger rivers. For Kennedy, that meant that smaller rivers upstream would significantly impact the physical, chemical or biological make-up of rivers downstream.

But Kavanaugh is widely expected to share the view of the court’s other conservative justices. Those justices concluded the waters protected by federal law did not include small streams that may not flow year-round. Using data from the EPA and the U.S. Geological Survey, EWG found more than 100 million American receive their drinking water supplies from these small streams.

The Supreme Court’s open seat is the critical vote on once-in-a-generation decisions related to air, water, and toxic chemicals. Judge Kavanaugh is no ordinary judge: He is a partisan warrior who has adopted extreme views to favor polluters at the expense of public health.

— 

Photo courtesy of Alex Brandon via AP Photo




Source: https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2018/09/brett-kavanaugh-good-news-polluters-bad-news-public-health

Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce – easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family.

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

Some of the best recipes come from inspiration from ingredients you have on hand to use up and that was totally what happened here when I had some ground pork to use up and spotted the carton of fresh pineapple juice in the fridge. I figured a sweet and spicy pineapple sauce would pair perfectly with some homemade pork meatballs.

To add the heat to these Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce I just used a pinch of red chilli flakes, but if you have some fresh red chilli on hand you can slice up one of those and use that instead. The rest of the sauce is just combining some usual Asian style flavours such as soy sauce, ginger and garlic.

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

These Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce can be ready as quickly as it takes you to make your sides, so are a perfect weeknight meal after a long day at work.


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Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

How can I add a 1/3 speed foods to these Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce?

I served alongside this Roasted Cauliflower Rice and some stir-fried shredded vegetables (such as cabbage and carrots) to really up all those healthy speed foods.

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

What kitchen items do I need to make these Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce?

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly


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Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce

Prep

Cook

Total

Yield 4 servings

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce – easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. 

Ingredients

  • 500g of extra lean ground pork
  • 1/2 tsp of ginger
  • 1/2 tsp of paprika
  • 1/2 tsp of onion powder
  • 1/2 tsp of garlic powder
  • 2 spring onions
  • 1 tbs of starch (corn, tapioca or arrowroot) – 1.5 syns
  • 1 tsp salt
  • cooking oil spray

for the spicy pineapple sauce:

  • 1/4 cup of pineapple juice – 2 syns
  • 2 tbs of soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup of water
  • 1 tsp of fresh grated ginger root
  • 1 clove of garlic, crushed
  • pinch of red chilli flakes (or use fresh red chilli)
  • 1 tbs of tomato paste

to serve:

  • pinch of sesame seeds
  • 2 spring onions, chopped

Instructions

  1. Add all the ingredients for the meatballs to a bowl and mix to combine.
  2. Form into meatballs
  3. Heat a frying pan over a medium high heat with some cooking oil spray, add the meatballs and cook until lightly browned on all sides. Remove and set aside.
  4. Add all the ingredients for the sauce to the frying pan and stir to combine. Heat until sauce reduces down and thickens.
  5. Add in meatballs and simmer until coated and cooked through
  6. sprinkle with fresh chopped spring onions and a pinch of sesame seed.s
  7. Serve with your choice of sides and enjoy

Notes

This recipe is gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

  • Extra Easy – 1 syn per serving
  • Original/SP –  1 syn per serving
  • WW Smart Points – 4 per serving
  • Paleo/Whole30 – use coconut aminos instead of soy sauce
  • Gluten Free – use a gluten free soy sauce

don’t fancy pork? swap for ground chicken or turkey.

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Nutritional information is an estimate and is to be used for informational purposes only. Ingredients can vary greatly from brand to brand and therefore it would be impossible to give accurate information.

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Courses Main

Cuisine Chinese

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 1 serving

Amount Per Serving

Calories 229

% Daily Value

Total Fat 4.4 g

7%

Saturated Fat 2.2 g

11%

Cholesterol 98 mg

33%

Sodium 625 mg

26%

Total Carbohydrates 7.1 g

2%

Dietary Fiber 0.8 g

3%

Sugars 2.7 g

Protein 39.5 g

79%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Delicious Low Syn Pork Meatballs with Spicy Pineapple Sauce - easy quick and a perfect meal for the whole family. | gluten free, dairy free, paleo, Whole30, Slimming World and Weight Watchers friendly

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Feb 15, Protein Requirements for Low Carb Diets

What are the actual protein requirements for those following a low carb diet? One measure is the RDA for protein.

The RDA is a general measurement or goal which is considered adequate to meet the known nutritional needs for healthy people. It’s basically the bare minimum needed to sustain the health of already healthy people.

If one is sick or healing from a wound, more protein would be needed to restore and sustain good health.

In those following a low carb diet, extra protein is needed because it takes the place of carbohydrates in providing a glucose source for the brain, helps maintain muscle mass, and helps with hunger.

Protein requirements in all of the studies I have read are based on Lean Body Mass (LBM). LBM is a measure of your total weight minus your fat mass.  It represents the weight of just your bones and muscles.



The point of protein intake during a low carb diet is to:

  1. Supply enough protein for the body to utilize as a glucose source in the context of reduced carbohydrate consumption, as least for the first 4 weeks of starting the diet (before keto-adaptation kicks in).
  2. Supply enough protein to maintain the body muscle mass, to rebuild the body after exercise or injury, and to maintain metabolic health.

Protein consumption recommendations should be set to ensure that the body does not burn up its own muscle mass to supply glucose for the brain, as it will do in the event of a real starvation scenario.


Protein Requirements: The Math

If a man weighs 200 pounds, and has a body fat percentage of 30%, his fat mass is 60 pounds, which leaves Lean Body Mass of 140 pounds.

Since a person has to have some fat to live, the fat mass can’t go below a certain percentage. For most men, a body fat percentage of 13-21 % is considered healthy. Bodybuilders shoot for a fat percentage in the 5-10% range.

To drop to a 20% fat percentage, a 200 pound guy with 30% fat would want lose about 24 pounds of fat, AND maintain his Lean Body Mass of 140 pounds while doing that.

Most studies I’ve read put the protein requirement at about 1 gram of protein per 1 kilogram of Lean Body Mass to maintain muscle mass.  (Note that a kilogram is about 2.2 pounds).

140 pounds LBM/2.2 = 63.6 kg/LBM

63.6 kg x 1 gram of protein = about 64 grams of protein per day.

So a 220 pound guy with 140 pounds of LBM has protein requirements of about 64 grams per day, JUST to MAINTAIN muscle mass.

But the body of a low carber also needs extra protein to give the brain a source of glucose since carbohydrates are being restricted. Plus, protein is needed to provide substrates for rebuilding muscle after exercise breaks it down.

It is known that about 58 % of any EXTRA protein that you eat is turned into glucose. I don’t have exact figures for how much you need to rebuild muscles after exercise.

So just to err on the side of caution, let’s say another .5 grams/kg/LBM would be needed for body maintenance and glucose support.

That would put our 140lb/LBM guy at a 1.5 grams protein/kgLBM requirement.

140 pounds LBM/2.2 = 63.6 kg/LBM = 63.6 kg * 1.5 gram of protein = about 95 grams per day.



So What Is Considered High Protein?

A “high” protein diet is one in which the highest percentage of calories come from protein. To calculate the percentage, divide each nutrient’s total calories by total daily calories:

Let’s say you are eating 1800 calories per day, and it is broken down like this:

  • 107 g protein/ day = 428 calories (107*4 cal/g) = 470  then divide 470 protein calories into total calories of 1800 = 26%
  • 130 g fat/day = 1170 calories (130*9 cal/g) = 1170 the divide 1170 calories into total of 1800 = 65%
  • 30 g carbs/day = 120 calories (30*4cal/g) = 120/1800 = 6%

We’ve established that around 95 grams of protein is a normal “requirement” for an average sized guy. In the calculations above, only 26% of calories come from protein. That is a good ratio for good health.

If this man were ONLY eating lean protein and no fat, even this normal amount might make him sick with rabbit starvation, a condition of acute malnutrition caused by a lack of fat in the diet. But if he is eating 130 grams of fat along with that protein, then his percentage of protein intake is only 26%, a normal amount.

The point here is that percentages are misleading.  If a person says that a low carb diet is “high protein”  the first question to ask is how many actual grams of protein is being consumed, as total calories will skew the percentages, whether calories are low or very high.

A true “high protein” diet is one in which a person is consistently eating more than 2-3 grams of protein per kilogram of lean body mass on a daily basis.  However, also be aware that Dr. Donald K. Layman’s research (see Pubmed) has shown that even 3 grams/per kilogram is safe for most people.

Here’s a video with Dr. Layman speaking on this topic.



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Done with Protein Requirements, back to Ketogenic Diet Plan



Source: https://www.ketogenic-diet-resource.com/protein-requirements.html

Ebola cases spike as nervous communities stop cooperating with health care workers

An outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus is on the rise in a regional trading hub in the Democratic Republic of the Congo as terrified residents, including those who have been infected, avoid health care workers.

Public health officials have watched with mounting concern in the last week as the number of cases of Ebola in the heavily populated North Kivu and Ituri Provinces have grown, more than two months after the outbreak was identified.

The Congolese Health Ministry said Wednesday that 194 cases of hemorrhagic fever have been reported in the two provinces in eastern Congo, along the border with Uganda.

That’s an increase of 32 cases in just a single week, a startling number for a virus that usually dies down soon after public health officials begin treating the outbreak.

One hundred twenty-two people have died so far. Another 53 people have been discharged from Ebola treatment centers after having survived the disease.

In a typical Ebola outbreak, the number of cases begins to fall after public health officials begin interceding to stop the spread of the virus.

“Usually, by this point in the response, we would have hoped to see no more cases,” said Tarik Jasarevic, a spokesman for the World Health Organization who visited the cities at the center of the outbreak last month.

Public health officials responding to the mounting outbreak are closely watching Beni, a city of about a quarter of a million residents and an important regional trading hub with ties to nearby Uganda. Of the 32 new cases identified in the last week, 26 have been in Beni.

Beni has been the site of several attacks from Islamist militants based in Uganda, which have terrorized city residents and hindered response operations. Health officials had to pause their response for several days to honor a city-wide period of mourning for those killed in the most violent attacks last month.

The security situation has made response efforts more difficult, said Anne Rimoin, an epidemiologist at the University of California at Los Angeles who researches the Ebola virus and other infectious diseases from Kinshasa.

“Response teams have limited working hours to reduce security risks after dark and must be accompanied by security details,” Rimoin said in an email.

The Health Ministry said more than 15,500 people had received a new Ebola vaccine, created in the wake of the 2014-2015 outbreak that killed more than 11,300 people in three impoverished West African nations.

Jessica Ilunga, a spokeswoman for the Congolese Health Ministry, said the new cases of the Ebola virus in Beni were concerning.

“For more than a month now, we have been witnessing an increase in community resistance in the city of Beni. In spite of all our community engagement efforts, some people continue to refuse to collaborate with the response teams,” Ilunga said in an email. “All the medical response is in place and well-functioning. So at this point it all comes down to the attitude of the community towards the response.”

North Kivu Province has proven an especially difficult area for public health officials to canvass for suspected cases. The province is Congo’s most populous outside of Kinshasa, the capital. An estimated 1 million of its 8 million residents are internally displaced people, who have fled from ethnic violence that has riven the eastern part of the country for decades.

Ituri Province, with a population a little more than half that of of North Kivu, has also experienced ethnic violence and cross-border attacks from Islamist rebels in Uganda.

Those responding to an outbreak spend the bulk of their time tracking down those who have a virus and figuring out how that virus spread. They then identify those who have had contacts with anyone infected with a virus, in order to quickly begin treating anyone who begins to show symptoms.

Those standard procedures become much more difficult in a situation when virus hunters must worry about their own security, or in cases when populations like internally displaced people move around frequently.

“Identifying all chains of transmission can be difficult given that the local communities in the affected areas are highly mobile and move from village to village for work and family reasons, as well as to seek health care. Access to certain areas is limited due to insecurity to conduct contact tracing,” Rimoin said.

An outbreak earlier this year in Équateur Province, along the Congo River, was contained within weeks in a much more stable security situation.

The current epidemic is the 14th known outbreak of the Zaire strain of the Ebola virus, known in epidemiological terms as EBOV. It is the strain with the highest mortality rate; in most outbreaks, more than 60 percent of those who come down with the disease die.




Source: https://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/410889-ebola-cases-spike-as-nervous-communities-stop-cooperating-with-health-care

The Best Pumpkin Pancakes

If you love pumpkin and pancakes, then you might enjoy these pumpkin pancakes with pumpkin seeds.

As soon as pumpkin “season” hits, if you’re the first person to jump on the new pumpkin-flavored food, then you’re in for another treat. These pumpkin pancakes aren’t just another delicious way to get your pumpkin fix, but they’re also a nutritious breakfast!

Pancakes are rich in carbohydrates with all the flours typically used to make them. These pumpkin pancakes have more seed flours which boost the healthy fat, minerals, and plant-based sources of protein.

What’s The Deal With Pumpkin?

Pumpkin is so popular in the US from pumpkin spice lattes to pumpkin hummus, pumpkin face masks, pumpkin smoothies, and the list goes on.

Beyond the novelty and seasonality of enjoying pumpkin in so many ways, pumpkin is very nutrient-dense!

Pumpkin is a winter squash hence the popularity around October when all the pumpkin foods are marketed in large. Pumpkin is technically a fruit because of the seeds, but is treated like a vegetable—pumpkin soups, roasted pumpkin—but also as a fruit in desserts like pumpkin pie and pumpkin cheesecake.

The bright orange color of pumpkins also tells you a lot about the most abundant antioxidant in this fruit, beta-carotene. We know how powerful this antioxidant is to our health from supporting our immune system, eye health, heart health, healthy skin (hello, glow), and potential weight maintenance because of the fiber content.

Pumpkin is a great way to enjoy the seasonal and festive flavor with the boost of nutrients. When buying a pumpkin from the store, you can get it whole and bake off the entire squash, but most likely you’ll find it in a can. If buying it in a can, make sure it’s organic and without any additional ingredients—sugar and cinnamon and other flavorings are commonly found as a pumpkin pie filling. Opt for the pumpkin puree plain.

Beta-carotene

The most notable nutrient found in pumpkin is beta-carotene (your body converts it to vitamin A). This antioxidant not only gives the pumpkin a beautiful golden orange color but also supplies your body with 245% RDA for vitamin A per 100g.

Pumpkin (the flesh) also contains minerals such as copper, calcium, potassium, and phosphorus.

Zinc and Minerals

Pumpkin seeds, on the other hand, are very rich in minerals zinc (71% RDA), iron (110% RDA), selenium (17% RDA), the amino acid tryptophan (which helps produce the good mood hormone serotonin), vitamin C, B vitamins, protein, and good fats- note this is with 100g, which would be about 1 cup or 4 servings of pumpkin seeds.

Pumpkin seeds not only taste great but have been shown to help with general antioxidant support, most notably from vitamin E. Most diets, the Standard American Diet, in particular, are low in minerals — pumpkin seeds are loaded with minerals and are great to incorporate often.

Pumpkin seeds, oils, and extracts have unique anti-microbial benefits, from the lignans in these seeds. Pumpkin seeds have also been studied with anti-cancer benefits, cardiovascular benefits, decreasing blood pressure, benefits with benign prostatic hyperplasia (i.e. prostate enlargement).




Source: https://nutritionstripped.com/pumpkin-pancakes/

How to calculate the calories a person burns while sleeping

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How to burn fat if you cannot workout

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Source: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325158.php